• Home
  • Pamphlets and Brochures
  • Donate now
  • Frequently Asked Questions
  • Please read

Our Helplines

Motherisk Helpline
1-877-439-2744 (Toll-free)
416-813-6780 (Toronto and GTA)

Alcohol and Substance
1-877-327-4636

Donated breast milk stored in banks versus breast milk purchased online

Maude St-Onge, MD MSc FRCPC, Shahnaz Chaudhry, MD MRCOG and Gideon Koren, MD FRCPC FACMT FACCT

February 2015

ABSTRACT

QUESTION

One of my patients asked if she could buy human milk on the Internet to feed her infant if the need arose. Is using donated breast milk from the milk bank safer than buying it online?

ANSWER

The World Health Organization and the American Academy of Pediatrics recommend the use of donated breast milk as the first alternative when maternal milk is not available, but the Canadian Paediatric Society does not endorse the sharing of unprocessed human milk. Human breast milk stored in milk banks differs from donor breast milk available via the Internet owing to its rigorous donor-selection process, frequent quality assurance inspections, regulated transport process, and pasteurization in accordance with food preparation guidelines set out by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency. Most samples purchased online contain Gram-negative bacteria or have a total aerobic bacteria count of more than 10 4 colony-forming units per millilitre; they also exhibit higher mean total aerobic bacteria counts, total Gram-negative bacteria counts, coliform bacteria counts, and Staphylococcus spp counts than milk bank samples do. Growth of most bacteria species is associated with the number of days in transit, which suggests poor collection, storage, or shipping practices for milk purchased online.

QUESTION

Une de mes patientes m'a demandé si elle pourrait se procurer du lait humain par Internet pour allaiter son nourrisson s'il le fallait. L'usage de lait humain provenant d'une banque de dons est-il plus sécuritaire que son achat en ligne?

RÉPONSE

L'Organisation mondiale de la Santé et l'American Academy of Pediatrics recommandent d'utiliser des dons de lait humain comme choix à privilégier lorsque le lait maternel n'est pas disponible. Cependant, la Société canadienne de pédiatrie n'approuve pas le partage de lait humain non traité. Le lait humain entreposé dans les banques de lait diffère de celui qu'on peut se procurer par Internet en raison du processus rigoureux de sélection des donneuses, des fréquentes inspections de la qualité, des procédés de transport règlementés et du processus de pasteurisation conforme aux directives établies par l'Agence canadienne d'inspection des aliments. La plupart des échantillons achetés en ligne contiennent des bactéries à gram négatif ou comptent au total plus de 10 4 unités formant colonies de bactéries aérobiques par millilitre; ils renferment aussi en moyenne au décompte total plus de bactéries aérobiques, de bactéries à gram négatif, de coliformes et de Staphylococcus spp que les échantillons des banques de lait. La croissance de la plupart des espèces de bactéries est associée au nombre de jours en transit, ce qui porte à croire que les conditions de collecte, d'entreposage et de transport sont médiocres pour le lait acheté en ligne. Full text ↓↓


The World Health Organization and the American Academy of Pediatrics recommend the use of donated breast milk as the first alternative when maternal milk is not available. 1 Human milk is recognized for its numerous benefits including inducing tolerance to allergens, providing passive immunization, improving lipid profiles, and controlling blood pressure. 2 In studies conducted in neonatal units, infants who were fed human breast milk had fewer severe infections, less necrotizing enterocolitis, and less colonization by pathogenic organisms. 3 However, more than 2 decades after fears of HIV transmission forced the closure of all but 1 of Canada's milk banks, health professionals and parents remain divided on the safety of sharing breast milk. 4 Breast milk is still easily available online (eg, www.eatsonfeets.org; http://hm4hb.net).

The Canadian Paediatric Society notes the following:

The preferred nutrition for the newborn is his/her own mother's milk. When this is not available or is limited, pasteurized human donor breast milk is a recommended alternative for hospitalized neonates … The Canadian Paediatric Society does not endorse the sharing of unprocessed human milk. 3

The Canadian Paediatric Society also recommends the following:

The use of pasteurized human donor breast milk should be prioritized to compromised preterm infants and selected ill term newborns. 3
Pasteurized human donor breast milk should only be prescribed following written informed consent from a parent or guardian. 3
Education of parents about the benefits of human breast milk or pasteurized human donor breast milk is essential to parental choice and informed decision making in prescribing an optimal feeding plan for hospitalized neonates. 3

Quality control in milk banks versus in milk sold online

Human breast milk stored in milk banks differs from donor breast milk available online owing to the former's rigorous donor-selection process, the frequent quality assurance inspections, its regulated transport process, and its pasteurization.

Most human milk banks use the same selection and screening procedures for donor mothers that local blood banks use for blood donors. 2 Breast milk can be contaminated with drugs, chemicals, or pathogenic bacteria. Therefore, milk bank donor mothers are chosen if they are in good health and do not regularly take medications or herbal supplements; as well, they must undergo blood testing. 5 Potential donors are excluded if they use illegal drugs or tobacco products; have undergone a blood transfusion or received blood products in the previous 4 months; have received an organ or tissue transplant in the previous 12 months; consume more than 2 ounces of alcohol per day regularly; have positive test results for HIV (or are at risk), human T-cell lymphoma virus, hepatitis B or C, or syphilis; were in the United Kingdom for more than 3 months between 1980 and 1996; or were in Europe for more than 5 years between 1980 and the present. 5

In milk banks, human donor milk samples are cultured for bacterial growth and all contaminated milk is discarded. 5 Keim et al 6 conducted an observational study to compare samples of human milk purchased via a US milk-sharing website to unpasteurized samples of milk donated to a milk bank. Most (74%) samples purchased via the Internet were colonized with Gram-negative bacteria or had more than 10 4 colony-forming units per millilitre total aerobic count; they also exhibited higher mean total aerobic bacteria counts, total Gram-negative bacteria counts, coliform bacteria counts, and Staphylococcus spp counts than milk bank samples did. No samples were contaminated with HIV, but 21% of human milk samples purchased online compared with 5% of milk bank samples had positive test results for cytomegalovirus DNA. Growth of most species was associated with the number of days in transit, which suggested poor collection, storage, or shipping practices for milk purchased online. Canadian human donor milk stored in banks is collected, stored, cultured, and pasteurized in accordance with food preparation guidelines set out by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency. 3

Pasteurization

While pasteurizing human breast milk inactivates bacterial and viral contaminants such as cytomegalovirus,7 pasteurized donor milk does not necessarily exhibit the same favourable effects as raw milk from the mother. 2 The pasteurization process results in the loss of quantity or activity of some biologically functional milk components to varying degrees, including mild to moderate decrease in immunoglobulin A; lower concentration of lactoferrin, lysozyme, some cytokines, growth factors, and hormones (insulinlike growth factor, adiponectin, insulin, and leptin); reduced antioxidant capacity; loss of lipase activity; lower immunoglobulin M concentration; and reduced white blood cell count. 1 Other important nutritional and biological components are preserved, such as oligosaccharides; lactose; glucose; long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids; gangliosides; vitamins A, D, E, and B12; folic acid; some cytokines (interleukins 2, 4, 5, 8, and 13); and some growth factors (epidermal growth factor and transforming growth factor β1). 1 Despite the loss of some biologically functional milk components, a meta-analysis conducted by Quigley and McGuire8 revealed that, in preterm and low-birth-weight infants, feeding with formula compared with donor breast milk resulted in a higher risk of developing necrotizing enterocolitis. Infants fed with donor milk exhibited slower growth rates compared with infants fed with formula, but no long-term effects on growth rates or neuro-developmental outcomes were identified, and pasteurized milk without fortification was given in most studies. Nutrient-fortified donor breast milk is now commonly given in neonatal care.

Nonetheless, new methods for improving the biological quality and safety of donor human milk besides the usual Holder pasteurization are under investigation. Alternative methods under consideration include high-temperature, short-term pasteurization, known as flash pasteurization (72.8°C for 5 to 15 seconds); its homemade low-tech variant used in developing countries, known as flash-heat treatment; thermoultrasonic treatment; high-pressure processing; and Ohmic heat treatment. 1

Resources and costs

Human donor milk from milk banks costs $3 to $5 (US) per ounce, and so it might cost $60 to $100 (US) per day for an 3.6-kg baby to consume 20 ounces per day, compared with only $0.50 to $2 (US) per ounce when the milk is purchased online. 9 But cost-effectiveness of human milk banking should not only be studied in relation to the expenses made during admission to the neonatal unit; it should also be seen in light of potential health care savings in later life. 2 No Canadian studies or data published on the economic evaluation of donor breast milk are currently available. 3

Canadian milk banks

In Canada, there are no direct costs incurred by the baby's family for the donor milk. Considering the limited resources available, milk bank services are mainly available for hospitalized babies with very low birth weight. It can only be provided by prescription after receiving signed consent from a parent or guardian. In the event that donor milk supplies are limited, the highest-risk babies will receive donor milk first. Box 1 lists milk banks currently operating in Canada.

Box 1.

Canadian milk banks

Four milk banks are currently offering services in Canada:

  • Montreal, Que: Héma-Québec (telephone 514 832-5000, extension 6909)
  • Toronto, Ont: Rogers Hixon Ontario Human Milk Bank (telephone 416 586-4800, extension 3053; e-mail info@milkbankontario.ca; website www.milkbankontario.ca)
  • Calgary, Alta: Calgary Mothers Milk Bank (telephone 403 475-6455; e-mail contact@calgarymothersmilkbank.ca)
  • Vancouver, BC: BC Women's Milk Bank (telephone 888 823-9992; e-mail info@bcwomensfoundation.org)
  • Canadian milk bank processing follows guidelines set out by the Human Milk Banking Association of North America and is regulated by Health Canada. 5

Conclusion

Human milk available via the Internet does not meet the expected rigorous criteria and is more often colonized with pathogenic organisms than donor human milk is. Human milk should be considered another regulated bodily substance, and milk sharing should only occur under medical supervision.

  :

Lait humain provenant d'une banque de dons ou acheté en ligne?

L'Organisation mondiale de la Santé et l'American Academy of Pediatrics recommandent d'utiliser des dons de lait humain comme choix à privilégier lorsque le lait maternel n'est pas disponible 1. Le lait humain est reconnu pour ses nombreux bienfaits; il induit notamment une tolérance aux allergènes, procure une immunisation passive, améliore le profil lipidique et contrôle la pression artérielle 2. Lors d'études réalisées dans des unités néonatales, les nouveaunés nourris au lait humain avaient moins d'infections graves, moins d'entérocolites nécrosantes et moins de colonisation par des organismes pathogènes 3. Toutefois, plus de 2 décennies après que les craintes de la transmission du VIH aient forcé la fermeture de toutes les banques de lait au Canada, sauf une, les professionnels de la santé et les parents restent divisés quant à l'innocuité du partage de lait humain 4. Le lait humain est encore aisément accessible en ligne (p. ex. au http://www.eatsonfeets.org; http://hm4hb.net).

La Société canadienne de pédiatrie affirme ce qui suit :

L'alimentation privilégiée du nouveau-né demeure le lait de sa mère. Lorsqu'il n'est pas accessible ou est limité, le lait pasteurisé de donneuses constitue une solution recommandée pour les nouveau-nés hospitalisés… La Société canadienne de pédiatrie n'approuve pas le partage de lait humain non traité 3.

La Société canadienne de pédiatrie présente aussi les recommandations suivantes:

Il faut donner le lait pasteurisé de donneuses en priorité aux prématurés et à certains nouveau-nés malades à terme sélectionnés 3.
Il ne faut prescrire le lait humain pasteurisé qu'après avoir obtenu un consentement éclairé écrit de la part d'un parent ou d'un tuteur 3.
Il est essentiel d'informer les parents des bienfaits du lait humain ou du lait pasteurisé de donneuses afin de leur permettre de faire un choix et de prendre une décision éclairée à l'égard de la prescription et d'un régime d'alimentation optimal pour leur nouveau-né hospitalisé 3.

Contrôle de la qualité dans les banques de lait par rapport au lait acheté en ligne

Le lait humain entreposé dans les banques de lait diffère de celui qu'on peut se procurer en ligne en raison du processus rigoureux de sélection des donneuses, des fréquentes inspections de la qualité, des procédés de transport règlementés et de la pasteurisation.

La plupart des banques de lait humain suivent les mêmes protocoles de sélection et de dépistage pour les mères donneuses que ceux utilisés par les banques de sang locales pour les donneurs de sang 2. Le lait humain peut être contaminé par des médicaments, des produits chimiques ou des bactéries. Par conséquent, les mères donneuses dans les banques de lait sont choisies si elles sont en bonne santé et si elles ne prennent pas régulièrement des médicaments ou des suppléments à base d'herbes médicinales; elles doivent aussi subir des analyses sanguines 5. Les donneuses potentielles sont exclues si elles consomment des drogues illégales ou des produits du tabac; si elles ont reçu une transfusion de sang ou des produits sanguins au cours des 4 mois précédents; si elles ont subi une transplantation d'organe ou de tissus dans les 12 mois précédents; si elles consomment plus de 2 onces d'alcool par jour régulièrement; si elles ont des résultats positifs au dépistage du VIH (ou sont à risque), du virus de leucémie à lymphocytes T humain, de l'hépatite B ou C ou de la syphilis; si elles ont séjourné au Royaume-Uni pendant plus de 3 mois entre 1980 et 1996; ou encore en Europe pendant plus de 5 ans entre 1980 et aujourd'hui 5.

Dans les banques de lait, on procède à des cultures des échantillons de dons de lait humain pour y déceler d'éventuelles croissances bactériennes et tout lait contaminé est jeté 5. Keim et ses collaborateurs 6 ont mené une étude observationnelle comparant des échantillons de lait humain obtenus par l'intermédiaire d'un site web de partage de lait américain à des échantillons de lait non pasteurisé donnés à une banque de lait. La plupart (74 %) des échantillons achetés par Internet étaient colonisés par des bactéries à gram négatif ou comptaient au total plus de 10 4 unités formant colonies de bactéries aérobiques par millilitre; ils renfermaient aussi en moyenne au décompte total plus de bactéries aérobiques, de bactéries à gram négatif, de coliformes et de Staphylococcus spp que les échantillons des banques de lait. Aucun échantillon n'était contaminé par le VIH, mais les résultats de tests de dépistage de l'ADN du cytomégalovirus étaient positifs dans 21 % des échantillons de lait achetés en ligne en comparaison de 5 % dans ceux provenant d'une banque de lait. La croissance de la plupart des espèces de bactéries était associée au nombre de jours en transit, ce qui porte à croire que les conditions de collecte, d'entreposage et de transport sont médiocres pour le lait acheté en ligne. Le lait humain dans les banques de dons canadiennes est recueilli, entreposé, pasteurisé et soumis à des cultures, conformément aux directives sur la préparation des aliments établies par l'Agence canadienne d'inspection des aliments 3.

Pasteurisation

Si la pasteurisation du lait humain inactive les contaminants bactériens et viraux comme le cytomégalovirus 7, le lait pasteurisé des donneuses n'a pas nécessairement les mêmes bienfaits que le lait cru de la mère 2. Le processus de pasteurisation se traduit par une perte de la quantité ou de l'activité de certaines composantes fonctionnelles biologiques du lait à divers degrés, notamment une diminution de légère à modérée de l'immunoglobuline A; une concentration plus faible de lactoferrine, de lysozyme, de certaines cytokines, de facteurs et d'hormones de croissance (facteur de croissance insulinomimétique, adiponectine, insuline et leptine); une moins grande capacité anti-oxydante; une perte de l'activité des lipases; une concentration plus faible d'immunoglobuline M; et une diminution du nombre de globules blancs 1. D'autres composantes nutritives et biologiques importantes sont préservées, comme les oligosaccharides; le lactose; le glucose; les acides gras polyinsaturés à longue chaîne; les gangliosides; les vitamines A, D, E et B12; l'acide folique; certaines cytokines (interleukines 2, 4, 5, 8 et 13); et certains facteurs de croissance (facteur de croissance épidermique et facteur de croissance transformant β1) 1. Malgré la perte de certaines composantes du lait biologiquement fonctionnelles, une méta-analyse effectuée par Quigley et McGuire 8 a révélé que, chez les nourrissons prématurés et de faible poids à la naissance, l'alimentation avec des préparations lactées au lieu du lait humain de donneuses résultait en un risque plus élevé de développer une entérocolite nécrosante. Les nourrissons alimentés avec du lait de donneuses avaient des taux de croissance plus lents que ceux nourris avec la préparation lactée, mais aucun effet à long terme sur la croissance ou le développement neurologique n'a été cerné et, dans la plupart des études, du lait pasteurisé non enrichi était utilisé. Du lait humain de donneuses enrichi d'éléments nutritifs est habituellement utilisé en soins néonatals.

Quoi qu'il en soit, de nouvelles méthodes pour améliorer la qualité biologique et la sécurité des dons de lait humain en plus de la pasteurisation de Holder habituelle font l'objet d'études. Parmi les autres méthodes envisagées, on peut mentionner la pasteurisation de courte durée et à haute température, connue sous le nom de pasteurisation éclair (flash) (72,8 °C pendant 5 à 15 secondes); sa version rudimentaire moins technologique, utilisée dans les pays en développement, appelée traitement thermique instantané; le traitement thermoultrasonique; le traitement à haute pression; et le chauffage ohmique 1.

Ressources et coûts

Le lait humain de donneuses provenant des banques de lait coûte de 3 à 5 $ US l'once et il pourrait en coûter de 60 à 100 $ US par jour pour nourrir un bébé de 3,6 kg à raison de 20 onces par jour, par rapport à seulement 0,50 à 2 $ US l'once lorsque le lait est acheté en ligne 6. Par contre, la rentabilité des banques de lait humain ne devrait pas être étudiée seulement en fonction des dépenses faites durant l'admission à l'unité néonatale; elle doit aussi être envisagée du point de vue des économies potentielles en soins de santé plus tard dans la vie 2. Il n'y a actuellement pas d'études ou de données canadiennes publiées sur l'évaluation économique du lait humain de donneuses 3.

Banques de lait canadiennes

Au Canada, il n'y a pas de coûts directs imposés à la famille du nourrisson pour le lait de donneuses. étant donné les ressources disponibles limitées, les services des banques de lait sont principalement offerts aux nouveaunés hospitalisés de très faible poids à la naissance. Ils ne sont fournis que sous ordonnance après avoir reçu un consentement par écrit d'un parent ou d'un tuteur. Dans l'éventualité où les approvisionnements en lait de donneuses seraient limités, les nouveau-nés à risque les plus élevés recevront les dons de lait en priorité. L'Encadré 1 présente la liste des banques de lait présentement en activité au Canada.

Encadré 1.

Banques de lait canadiennes

Quatre banques de lait offrent actuellement des services au Canada :

Le traitement dans les banques de lait canadiennes se conforme aux directives établies par la Human Milk Banking Association of North America et est règlementé par Santé Canada 5.

Le lait humain accessible par Internet ne se conforme pas aux rigoureux critères auxquels on pourrait s'attendre et il est plus souvent colonisé par des organismes pathogènes que le lait humain de donneuses. Le lait humain devrait être considéré comme une autre substance organique règlementée, et le partage de lait ne devrait se produire que sous supervision médicale.

Notes

Motherisk questions are prepared by the Motherisk Team at The Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto, Ont. Dr St-Onge is a clinical pharmacology and toxicology resident at the University of Toronto. Dr Chaudhry is a clinical pharmacology and toxicology fellow with and Dr Koren is Director of the Motherisk program. Dr Koren is supported by a Research Leadership for Better Pharmacotherapy during pregnancy and Lactation.

Do you have questions about the effects of drugs, chemicals, radiation, or infections in women who are pregnant or breastfeeding? We invite you to submit them to the Motherisk Program by fax at 416 813-7562; they will be addressed in future Motherisk Updates.

Published Motherisk Updates are available on the Canadian Family Physician website (www.cfp.ca) and also on the Motherisk website.


L'équipe de Motherisk au Hospital for Sick Children à Toronto, en Ontario, prépare les réponses aux questions à Motherisk. La Dre St-Onge est résidente en pharmacologie clinique et en toxicologie à l'Université de Toronto. La Dre Chaudhry est titulaire d'une bourse de recherche en pharmacologie clinique et en toxicologie et le Dr Koren est directeur du Programme Motherisk. Le Dr Koren est financé par le Research Leadership for Better Pharmacotherapy during pregnancy and Lactation.

Avez-vous des questions concernant les effets des médicaments, des produits chimiques, du rayonnement ou des infections chez les femmes enceintes ou qui allaitent? Nous vous invitons à les poser au Programme Motherisk par télécopieur au 416 813-7562; nous y répondrons dans de futures Mises à jour de Motherisk. Les Mises à jour de Motherisk publiées sont accessibles dans le site web du Médecin de famille canadien (www.cfp.ca) et dans le site web de Motherisk.

View abstract »»

Footnotes

This article is eligible for Mainpro-M1 credits. To earn credits, go to www.cfp.ca and click on the Mainpro link.
Cet article donne droit à des crédits Mainpro-M1. Pour obtenir des crédits, allez à www.cfp.ca et cliquez sur le lien vers Mainpro.

Competing interests / Intérêts concurrents
None declared / Aucun déclaré

Copyright © the College of Family Physicians of Canada
Can Fam Physician
Vol. 61, No. 2, February 2015

References

  1. ESPGHAN Committee on Nutrition, Arslanoglu S, Corpeleijn W, Moro G, Braegger C, Campoy C, et al. Donor human milk for preterm infants: current evidence and research directions. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr 2013;57(4):535-42. CrossRef | Medline | Google Scholar
  2. Corpeleijn WE, Vermeulen MJ, van Vliet I, Kruger C, van Goudoever JB. Human milk banking—facts and issues to resolve. Nutrients 2010;2(7):762-9. Epub 2010 Jul 13. Medline | Google Scholar
  3. Kim JH, Unger S. Human milk banking. Paediatr Child Health 2010;15(9):595-602. Medline | Google Scholar
  4. Vogel L. Milk sharing: boon or biohazard? CMAJ 2011;183(3):E155-6. Epub 2011 Jan 31. FREE Full Text
  5. Human Milk Banking Association of North America [website]. Donate milk. Sharing milk through a non-profit milk bank saves lives! Fort Worth, TX: Human Milk Banking Association of North America; 2014. Available from: https://www.hmbana.org/donate-milk. Accessed 2014 Jul 25.
  6. Keim SA, Hogan JS, McNamara KA, Gudimetla V, Dillon CE, Kwiek JJ, et al. Microbial contamination of human milk purchased via the Internet. Pediatrics 2013;132(5):e1227-35. Epub 2013 Oct 21. Abstract/FREE Full Text
  7. Friis H, Andersen HK. Rate of inactivation of cytomegalovirus in raw banked milk during storage at -20 degrees C and pasteurization. Br Med J (Clin Res Ed) 1982;285(6355):1604-5. Abstract/FREE Full Text
  8. Quigley M, McGuire W. Formula versus donor breast milk for feeding preterm or low birth weight infants. Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2014;(4):CD002971.Google Scholar
  9. Nelson R. Breast milk sharing is making a comeback, but should it? Am J Nurs 2012;112(6):19-20. Medline | Google Scholar
Valid XHTML 1.0 Transitional [Valid RSS]

Motherisk is proud to be affiliated with OTIS, The Organization of Teratology Information Specialists. OTIS is a network of information services across North America.

* - "MOTHERISK - Treating the mother - Protecting the unborn" is an official mark of The Hospital for Sick Children. All rights reserved.

The information on this website is not intended as a substitute for the advice and care of your doctor or other health-care provider. Always consult your doctor if you have any questions about exposures during pregnancy and before you take any medications.

Copyright © 1999-2017 The Hospital for Sick Children (SickKids). All rights reserved.

The Hospital for Sick Children (SickKids) is a health-care, teaching and research centre dedicated exclusively to children; affiliated with the University of Toronto. For general inquires please call: 416-813-1500.

  |  Contact SickKids  |  Terms of Use