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The Motherisk Nausea and Vomiting of Pregnancy (NVP) Forum

Motherisk receives questions from around the world about morning sickness symptoms, effects, treatments and ways to cope. Those questions and answers are posted here for anyone to read, provided the reader acknowledges and accepts the proviso and disclaimer below.

Gravol for NVP

NVP Counselor
Date: 2004-08-16

Question:
I am 9 weeks pregnant with a second child. I suffer from thalasemia minor which causes a lowered hemoglobin. My first pregnancy was uneventful other than occasional morning sickness. This pregnancy has been different. Two weeks ago I started with symptoms of extreme dizziness, to the point of almost fainting, low blood pressure 80/60 and also a lowered hemoglobin. I have missed the last two weeks of work due to extreme weakness. While in hospital over the weekend, the doctor gave me IV fluids and Gravol. He told me that Gravol is safe during pregnancy. Can you confirm if this is true? It would seem that most women would use Gravol if it was safe, due to the ease of availability. Also I am wondering if there is anything I can do to feel better while at home and upon returning to work. Thank you!

Answer:
Typically NVP symptoms include nausea, though not dizziness and near fainting. Continue to consult your physicians on how to keep your medical condition under control.

Gravol is used to treat NVP as you received it in IV fluid and it is safe. That means that it is not known to increase your baseline risk of 1 percent to 3 percent for birth defect. This baseline risk is present in any pregnancy.

When vomiting has been controlled with IV gravol, women in Canada are treated with Diclectin, the safe and approved treatment. Diclectin is Vitamin B6 and doxylamine in a delayed release medication. It is usually taken three time per day by most women. For more information pelase phone the Motherisk NVP Helpline at 1-800-436-8477.

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