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The Motherisk Nausea and Vomiting of Pregnancy (NVP) Forum

Motherisk receives questions from around the world about morning sickness symptoms, effects, treatments and ways to cope. Those questions and answers are posted here for anyone to read, provided the reader acknowledges and accepts the proviso and disclaimer below.

Forum > NVP Symptoms and Effects: Planning ahead
Long term effects of NVP treatment

NVP Counselor
Date: 2006-03-13

Question:
I am planning on becoming pregnant with my second baby. I had terrible morning sickness with my first. By 9 weeks I started vomiting and couldn't eat. I have blood sugar problems and felt terrible. I immediately called my dr. and was placed on 25 mg vitamin b6 and 1/2 tablet of unisom taken 3x a day.

My morning sickness continued and continued. I started to feel better at 14 weeks, but every attempt to reduce my intake of vitamin b6/unisom was met with vomiting. I was still extremely averted to most protein and vegetables. I could just keep down a small handful of foods which included peanut butter and milk.

At 7 months I went on zofran instead and found myself able to eat some meat and felt so much better. However the morning sickness had continued on for so long that I still had many issues with food.

My daughter was born without birth defects, but has food allergies to milk, peanuts, and eggs.

I know I will have to take something for my next pregnancy. I wanted to take zofran, but your website would indicate the vitamin b6/unisom combo is better. I have 3 questions:

  1. Is vitamin b6/unisom addictive? Had I not been continuously on the medication is it possible my morning sickness would have ended on its own, but because my body got used to the vitamin b6 and unisom I vomitted every time I tried to stop taking it (or was I just that sick)? Is this a common problem with patients taking this medicine (that the nausea just goes on and on)?
  2. Is vitamin b6/unisom considered safe to be taken all 9 months of pregnancy, as opposed to just the first trimester?
  3. is there any reason for me to believe that having taken an antihistamine for 7 months of my pregnancy while eating peanut butter and milk caused my daughter allergies to those foods?

Sorry for such long questions. I really hope you can help me decide if zofran would be better or not. I hear such conflicting information.

Answer:

  1. The reason your morning sickness did not improve on the vitamin B6 and Unisom, was because you probably did not take a high enough dose of the medication, which can be used up to Vit B6 25mg 4/day and 1 tablet of Unisom 4/day.

    Vitamin B6 is considered safe to take anytime during pregnancy and as far as we know it would not cause your daughter to have allergies to the foods you were eating at that stage of your pregnancy.

  2. Zofran is used quite often to treat morning sickness and at Motherisk we recently published a study on the outcomes of 176 pregnancies of women who used it during pregnancy. There was no increase risk in the rates of malformations or other adverse effects in their babies, compared to a control group of women who did not use Zofran.

Bottom line: you should take what is the most effective for you.

If you live in North America, you can call our NVP helpline at 1 800 436-8477 for more information.

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